The Challenge of Diabetes

You know, you may think diabetes is my passion but it’s not. Solving problems and thinking things through. That’s my passion. All my life I have been a thinker and a problem solver and I have solved the holy mother of all my particular problems in my corner of the universe.

Whether you believe it or not, hating diabetes (or any other illness, difficulty, or trouble you face) is the real problem. If you hate having diabetes, that fact – the unhappiness about it, is an unhealthy mental condition that is causing you unnecessary pain, contributing to unhealthiness, and even may be your biggest problem with diabetes control.

 

Why would I say that?

Why would I say that?

If you believe diabetes is a death sentence then that’s what it will be for you – a self-fulfilling prophecy.  If you look at diabetes as a ball and chain, chaining you to a miserable future, then it will be just that. And if it is a death sentence for you, like it was for me, you will not be at all happy about managing it. Your doctor will teach you proper self-care, but you may tell yourself almost anything to keep from having to face and deal with the monster. Or you will follow your doctor’s advice to the letter and feel tied to it like a ball and chain, hoping science will eventually free you by handing you a cure.

Someone recently asked me whether the diabetes community might not be better served by writing and speaking about how to prevent diabetes instead of teaching people how to thrive if they have diabetes. I know there are things I might have done to prevent it. But it is part of the human condition that we may develop an unknown and undeserved illness or disease even though we did everything possible to prevent it. And people with diabetes may be able to reverse it in some cases but it’s not likely to be cured once a person has it.

 

Bring on the cure then!

Bring on the cure then!

I’ll be happy when science finally offers a cure but I serve my community by helping people understand it doesn’t have to be a death-sentence. I say this from experience: I hated it when I was diagnosed and I hated having it for over 20 years. Hating it wasn’t helping me and it finally dawned on me that hating it wasn’t the only choice I had. So I changed the way I was looking at it. From there the solution revealed itself to me; when I began to look at it from a different perspective. The real problem is thinking about it as a monster. That’s what needs to change.  

The cure will not be one thing either. Medical researchers know of at least a half dozen causes of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, from a genetic predisposition to an overly sensitive immune system; from chronic depression to an acute infection in the body. And there are more like weight, diet, and lifestyle (who knows whether these were the causes or the result of type 2 diabetes?).

 

It's not really a monster

It's not really a monster

Cure is a curious word whose root comes from curator or one who takes care. In this case cure seems to have more to do with care than with eliminating the disease.

I wish diabetes wasn’t an illness we currently have to live with in our society, but it is. I wish people wouldn’t stigmatize it or put people in a box just because they have it, but that’s what some of us humans do. Mostly I wish people hiding from the monster would face it. It’s just not as difficult as you may think. Personally, while I have not been able to jump-start my pancreas to produce insulin, I am healthier than I have ever been. I rarely catch colds and flu now, a huge change from just a few years ago, and I attribute it to my improved life-approach.

 

It's harder at the beginning

It's harder at the beginning

Since I began success coaching, and especially since embarking on this project, I have spoken with many people who live with diabetes. Many are well-adjusted, happy people living a lifestyle they know they have chosen. Diabetes is one aspect of their lives but it does not define them. They deal with diabetes then go to work or on vacation or mow the lawn. They stop to test and eat and then go about their tasks as planned. It takes very little time and most of all, it takes very little thought.

Unlike them, before I developed my own authentic system, whenever I thought to test the feelings that accompanied the thought were full of anger and resentment. Why do I have to have this? Why do most people not have to deal with it? Why can’t it be easy? And I felt like my life was mediocre largely due to diabetes.

When I talk with people with diabetes I find there is a range from dissatisfaction to satisfaction. But if I was to keep track I would probably guess that over eighty percent of people I talk with have not been successful at integrating diabetes into their lives. Eighty percent are still upset about it. These four out of five are who I work with. I know how to help people begin, and how to help boost your energy for the process. This will bring faster results more quickly than you ever thought possible. You will have everything you need to know along the way to the point of moving forward without my help.

Jayson Munday